STAFFORDSHIRE HOME GUARD WEBSITE

MEMORIES AND INFORMATION
relating to Home Guard units in
SHROPSHIRE

This is a page within the www.staffshomeguard.co.uk website. To see full contents, go to SITE MAP.
The most recent addition was on 6th August 2015

 

This page includes memories of and miscellaneous information about SHROPSHIRE units ONLY.
(Places listed alphabetically on the basis of 1940s county boundaries).

BERRINGTON - BURLTON -  CLEE HILL - FORTON HEATH - HADLEY and WELLINGTON - HANWOOD HINKSAY,  HOMER FARM and STIRCHLEY - LOPPINGTON - MAESBROOK - ONIBURY - OSWESTRY - SHREWSBURY - WELLINGTON


(Similar pages are available elsewhere dealing with  The 32nd (Aldridge) Battalion and units in Staffordshire, Warwickshire, Worcestershire and All Other Counties.)  
Contributions from visitors are warmly welcomed - and, please, an alert on any non-functioning link.
Use FEEDBACK if you have material you would like to appear here. 
           

SEARCH this website

****************************************************************************************

BERRINGTON
In The Battle of Berrington Mr. Fred Evans recounts his unit's encounter with a group of Dutch commandos. (You will leave this site).

****************************************************************************************

BURLTON (and LOPPINGTON)
The sad story of Pte. Francis Pugh of the 5th Platoon, 3rd Shropshire Battalion.

****************************************************************************************

CLEE HILL
Mr. Dennis Crowther relates, in verse, The Battle of Titterstone Clee. (You will leave this site).

****************************************************************************************

FORTON HEATH
In On the Home Front, Forton Heath, Shropshire Mr. Ken Offland remembers his Home Guard service:

"......So it was the Home Guard. We had a local man in charge of us, Emrys Tudor, who was a director of Shrewsbury Town Football Club, and I once ‘shot’ our commanding officer on a manoeuvre.................. In the Home Guard we had a proper military Sergeant Major training us, so he was always taking the mickey out of us. He used to shout at me: ‘Offland, don’t hold that gun like an umbrella!’ I wasn’t a natural army man, not cut out for killing people, but I’m sure we’d have done our stuff if we’d had to......."

© Ken Offland 2005      To read the rest of this interesting memoir in its original setting, the BBC's excellent People's War Archive, please click here.    (You will leave this site.  WW2 People's War is an online archive of wartime memories contributed by members of the public and gathered by the BBC. The complete archive can be found at www.bbc.co.uk/ww2peopleswar.)

***************************************************************************************

HADLEY and WELLINGTON: A MEMOIR
Click on the title above to read Leslie Frost Remembers The War Years, an excellent illustrated memoir by William Leslie Frost (1913-1984) who was a designer working on Spitfire fuselages and a member of a Wellington unit of the Home Guard where he was Weapons Training Officer.

***************************************************************************************

HANWOOD and CRUCK MEOLE
Mr. Arthur Jones
has contacted staffshomeguard as follows:

My father, Percy Arthur Jones of The Bungalow, Pound Lane, Hanwood, Nr. Shrewsbury served in one of the local H.G. units from near its inception until stand down. He died in 1949. I was 5 at that time. His unit would probably have been Hanwood, or Cruck Meole if they had one. Several requests to the department holding details of those serving in the H.G. have all been ignored. As I can barely remember my father, I would be delighted if anyone can provide me with any information relating to these years of his life. Many thanks.

Any visitor to the site who has information about these units is invited to contact Mr. Jones direct - see Guestbook for contact information - or if preferred through this site using Feedback.

***************************************************************************************

HINKSAY, HOMER FARM and STIRCHLEY
Mr. Albert Grice's memories of encounters with the local Home Guard. (You will leave this site).

***************************************************************************************

LOPPINGTON
Please see BURLTON above.

****************************************************************************************

MAESBROOK
In an interesting memoir, Wartime Boyhood on a Shropshire Farm, Mr Edmund Davies remembers the ARP and Home Guard:

"....My memories of the early years of the war include the work of the village Air Raid warden, Mr. Harry Ratcliffe, who was responsible for strict black-out control. Since German bombers flew overhead on night raids to Manchester, Liverpool and Birkenhead, any householder showing a chink of light through their curtains would be reprimanded. On the farm, all our portable paraffin lanterns had one side of their glass protection painted black or red, so that little light would be shown to the night sky. Mr. Ratcliffe also issued gas masks to every villager.
Maesbrook also had its own Home Guard, whose members practised using various firing weapons, did field maneouvres, drill and communication. They were men who knew every wood, brook, nook and cranny in the village and were not "daft" as portrayed in TV's 'Dad's Army' series..
...."

© Edmund Davies 2005    To read the whole of this interesting memoir in its original setting, the BBC's excellent People's War Archive, please click here.  (You will leave this site.  WW2 People's War is an online archive of wartime memories contributed by members of the public and gathered by the BBC. The complete archive can be found at www.bbc.co.uk/ww2peopleswar.)

***************************************************************************************

ONIBURY
A Home Guard Training School,
No. 3 G.H.Q. School (Home Guard), was located at Onibury, near Craven Arms.

***************************************************************************************
OSWESTRY
John Edward Griffiths (Pte. Jack Griffiths) served with the Oswestry Home Guard despite severe disability. His story, together with images of him and his comrades, may be seen here. Jack Griffiths's son is seeking further information about the unit and his father's service in it.

An excellent image of a unit of the Oswestry Home Guard (containing the only identified member, George Cartwright) is shown here.

*********************************************

SHREWSBURY

Shrewsbury was defended by the 1st Shropshire Battalion. At the beginning Lt.-Col. W.R.H. Dann D.S.O. was in command but later responsibility fell to Lt.-Col. F.H. Liddell, M.C. who was promoted from within the Battalion where he had previously served as a Company Commander with the rank of Major.

Memories of Frank Liddell, a remarkable citizen of Shrewsbury, can be read on associated pages:
- His Home Guard career
- The Tattoo of August 19th, 1944
- His Great War service
 
(Added August 2015)

**********

Read an informative and entertaining description of the defence of Shrewsbury by clicking Three Shells To Save Town, an article by Toby Neal relating the experiences of Mr. Glyn Rowlands in the 1st Battn. Shropshire Home Guard, first published in the Shropshire Star.

**********

The story of Eric Blain, an employee of Sentinel and a member of a Shrewsbury Home Guard unit.

**********

Within a fascinating memoir of wartime Shrewsbury seen through the eyes of a very small boy, Mr. Graham Brown tells how his father worked in a reserved occupation mainly in Swansea and Cardiff and from time to time would come home to Shrewsbury to see his family:

"...Sidelined from the ‘real’ armed forces, my father was in the Home Guard, which occupied him only slightly when home from South Wales. His khaki uniform hung on the back of the bedroom door. According to him, duties involved an evening meeting, probably a Friday, with a number of other blokes out in the Shropshire countryside. They all put on their uniforms and went off to test a couple of smoke bombs and produce a report on their effectiveness. This task probably detained them for about thirty minutes and they spent the rest of the evening in the nearest village pub. Sometimes he returned with a locally trapped rabbit or chicken, often poached, which he then skinned or plucked, a job my mother wouldn’t touch....."

© Graham Brown 2005    To read the whole of this interesting memoir in its original setting, the BBC's excellent People's War Archive, please click here.  (You will leave this site.  WW2 People's War is an online archive of wartime memories contributed by members of the public and gathered by the BBC. The complete archive can be found at www.bbc.co.uk/ww2peopleswar.)

***************************************************************************************

WELLINGTON
Captain John Greenwood, b.1893 in Yorkshire, was a member of the Wellington Battalion and had served in the Manchester Regiment in the Great War. Amongst aficionados of the hobby, he is regarded as one of the true pioneers of model soldier making.
At the time of his Home Guard service he was making identification models of German troops for the armed forces.

**********

WELLINGTON RAILWAY HOME GUARD PLATOON
Click on the title above to see a captioned picture of this unit taken in Wellington in August 1942.

**********

WELLINGTON HOME GUARD PARADE 1942
An image of the Home Guard parading in Wellington.

**********

See also HADLEY and WELLINGTON above.

***************************************************************************************

Grateful acknowledgement for badge images to Stanley C. Jenkins.

SEARCH this website